No Problem With Virginia's
'Moment Of Silence'
Dave Clemens

Graphic Rule

From: "Positive Atheism" <editor@positiveatheism.org>
To:
Subject: Re: News Tid-Bits
Date: Tuesday, June 27, 2000 4:32 PM

We didn't give it any thought -- because it was called "Roll Call." Kids were allowed to do with it what they wanted (including pray) as long as they remained quietly seated. The teachers checked the seating chart against the seated students and nobody had any qualms about it.

I don't understand why they want to give this moment any religious overtones -- except that many Christians want to use this as a foot in the door to enforce their narrow version of Christianity upon the rest of us -- Christian and non-Christian alike. It is this tendency of such Christians, who mask their real motives in the name of fairness or whatever, that has folks like me running scared of almost any move they make.

If you have the time, could you please explain some of the ways opposing the Christians' "moment of silence" movement would be inconsistent with objective principles. We're not challenging you, we're just curious. If opposing the "moment of silence" is a mark of inconsistency, I want to know about it so I can reconsider my position.

Cliff Walker
"Positive Atheism" Magazine

Graphic Rule

Graphic Rule

From: "Positive Atheism" <editor@positiveatheism.org>
To:
Subject: Re: News Tid-Bits
Date: Wednesday, June 28, 2000 12:18 AM

While the moment of silence is certainly not our highest priority, I am thankful to the ACLU for taking on this case. There is a difference between setting aside time during class specifically so that some (but not all) can have an opportunity to pray, and arranging the schedule so that those who want an opportunity to pray may do so during, say, roll call. Since this difference is so blatant, and since I was held after class for refusing to pray in the fourth grade (circa 1966 -- two or three years after Murray v. Curlett), I will continue to support the ACLU's efforts to keep a lid on turning class time into a religious ritual.

Cliff Walker
"Positive Atheism" Magazine

Graphic Rule

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