Judge Roy Moore
 (And Other Sneaky Christians) 
Joel

Graphic Rule

From: "Positive Atheism Magazine"
To: "Joel"
Subject: Re: Positive_Atheism_Letters_Section
Date: October 31, 2001

Actually, I suspect that this was their second response, the first one being a request that he not erect his monument -- which was put up by stealth anyway, so we didn't hear much about it.
 

I immediately spoke out against this move. In "To Symbolize That Which Is Not" (August, 2001), I said, "This is the trademark of a private group, despised by many theists and even a few atheists. Their logo has as much right to be on public property as do Moore's ancient taboos against the Evil Eye." Back then, it did not appear that this was a group-wide decision on the part of American Atheists, but a decision made locally. Nowadays that does appear to be the case.
 

I would not endorse this move because to juxtapose the Bill of Rights against a violation of those rights would only highlight their ineffectiveness as a protective measure. We need to make the Bill of Rights protect us against the likes of Judge Moore, not give in to his abuses of and disdain toward our Religious Liberties. I would, however, just love to see the Bill of Rights erected instead of Moore's religious display! In fact, I would just love to see the people place the Bill of Rights up anywhere a copy of the Ten Commandments has been removed! That would be quite an effective message, if you ask me: "Erected by Such-&-So Committee on This-or-That date to celebrate the removal of an unconstitutional display which made Our Fine Town appear to be in the awkward (and illegal) position of endorsing a specific religious sect."
 

As I mentioned, Moore's move was quiet and very private -- a "stealth" action, according to some. Judge Roy Moore, knowing that what he was doing was wrong and knowing that even in Alabama he would go up against fierce opposition, was very sneaky about the whole thing. Moore knows, through repeated experience, that one needs to get up pretty early in the morning in order to practice this particular brand of the Christian religion.
 

I agree that this would have been a superior-looking request than the logo of American Atheists, but it would not have served the intended purpose of the Alabama activists, which was to showcase just how wrong it is to post the trademark slogan of a private religious group on public land. Such trademark slogans include a Reader's Digest-style "Condensed Version" of the Protestant listing of the First Stone Tablets of the Hebrew Ten Commandments (Exodus 20, cf. Exodus 34) and the Protestant rendition of the "Lord's Prayer" passage from the Christian Bible.
 

The Reader's Digest-style "Condensed Version" of the Protestant listing of the First Stone Tablets of the Hebrew Ten Commandments would still be there, and they would have yet another "precedent" because once again we did not properly challenge this one.
 

No! Because the display would have been duly "secularized," the Reader's Digest-style "Condensed Version" of the Protestant listing of the First Stone Tablets of the Hebrew Ten Commandments would stay! Don't you get it? the Lemon Compromise, instead of making the First Amendment prevent the government from establishing religion, now prevents the government from "excessive entanglement" with religion. This means that all they gotta do is erect a fifty-foot Santa off to the side of the Baby Jesus in a park, the Baby Jesus gets to stay. That was what the "Santazilla" case was all about.

The same thing would happen if Judge Moore erected the Bill of Rights next to his Reader's Digest-style "Condensed Version" of the Protestant listing of the First Stone Tablets of the Hebrew Ten Commandments: the "whole display" would have taken on a "secularized" meaning and would not be seen, under the Lemon Compromise, as an "excessive entanglement."
 

This sounds nice, but what makes you think Judge Roy Moore would respect American law any more than he does today, simply because he must see it a few more times each day?

The problem is not that Judge Moore doesn't know the law, it's that he does not respect the law. American law, according to Judge Moore, is not the supreme law, but is a subsidiary law, useful only as long as it does not contradict the Commandments of Judge Moore's Imaginary Friend.
 

No. Those who are not thinking about this problem at all, they're the ones who are dreaming. At least you show a desire to do something about it. And I only wish your ideas sounded better than what's already been tried.

The big problem is that since the Day of Atrocity, any move on our part to try to get the government to obey the law makes us appear unpatriotic. Study the McCarthy Era of the 1950s. Check, even, the newsreels of the 1940s to see what I mean: as William S. Burroughs said, "Indifference is not an option.... When the enemy's face showed up on the screen, they'd better scream loud and scream ugly!"

Cliff Walker
Positive Atheism Magazine
Six years of service to
     people with no reason to believe

Graphic Rule

Graphic Rule

From: "Positive Atheism Magazine"
To: "Van Citters/All Media Marketing"
Subject: Re: Positive_Atheism_Letters_Section
Date: November 01, 2001 2:05 AM

Not yelling at you! (not yet, anyway!) You're on our side, remember? We gotta hold you to higher standards than the others, don't we?

(If I were yelling at you, you'd definitely know about it!)

To learn about the hard-line Separationism that it's probably going to take to check George Bush and Judge Moore and the likes, we all need check out Gene Garman's page, as you have already done.

My only reservation is the regret that I only recently met Gene, and have been working in this field for years without his crucial perspective. After you've wallowed in that for a while, so to speak, you can liberalize all you want and you'll still be firmly within bounds!

All kidding aside, that's what this is all about! We test our current understanding by offering it up to the scrutiny of others.

Cliff Walker
Positive Atheism Magazine
Six years of service to
     people with no reason to believe

Graphic Rule

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