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Anne Newport Royall (1769-1854)
Early State-Church Separationist

I find that the whole weight of relieving human misery and distress falls on the shoulders of those Heretics and Infidels; and though great part of this distress has been occasioned by those ravening wolves' hopeful converts, ... These Heretics are the men that feed the hungry, cloth the naked, taken in the stranger, visit the sick and the prisoner.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 29

Fanaticism and bigotry require any food but common sense and reason, which would break the charm of those spellbound fanatics.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 29

The late proceedings of those daring invaders to establish a national religion have opened the eyes of all lovers of liberty and religion.... I have been told they have thrown off the mask and are preaching to the people to elect none but godly men to represent them in the General and State Legislatures; as to godly men, I believe they are very scarce, but what they mean by godly people, is people of their own stamp; to bring this about they are establishing presses over the whole country, and this they are able to do as they have the greatest revenue in the country.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 27

Figures cannot calculate the amount collected by those public and private robbers: it is more than would liberate every slave in the United States; it would pay the British debt! They say, "We do not force people to give." I see no difference between forcing a man out of his money, at the mouth of a pistol, and forcing it from by trick and cunning; the crime is the same.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 27

[G]et two-thirds of the states to alter the Constitution; come out with their national religion, and then let the people get their throats ready.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 27

In all countries, and in all ages, from the Druids down to brother Beecher, priests have aimed at universal power.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 28; echoes of Thomas Jefferson's statement to Horatio Alger, "In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty."

If those millions squandered on designing missionaries had been deposited in funds for the support of yourselves, when old age, misfortune, or sickness (from which none are exempt,) overtakes you, or for the distressed of your race, what a heaven of happiness you would have created on earth: ye would now be an ornament to your sex, and ages to come would call you blessed. But it is in vain to try -- a priest-ridden female is lost to reason. Why? because she has surrendered her reason to the ... missionaries ... the orthodox; they are the grand deceivers....
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 29

These bible people remind me of another calamity similar to this missionary scheme, when our people, or any christian power would go to Africa for the pious purpose of kidnapping negroes, the mother would cry out to her children "run, run, the christians are coming," so when ever you hear "bibles," run for your life, if you do not want your pockets picked, or to be insulted and slandered as I was.... and if you hear "hopeful conversions" or the "gospel," don't stop to look behind you.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 29

[L]ike a pestilence [they] cover the land; not to scatter blessings amongst the distressed, root out ignorance, ... or diffuse the lights of knowledge, to ennoble the age, or amend mankind; not to break the chains of slavery,or teach man his religious or political duties, or cultivate the arts and sciences, no; quite the reverse. Their object and their interest is to plunge mankind into ignorance, to make him a bigot, a fanatic, a hypocrite, a heathen, to hate every sect but his own, (the orthodox,) to shut his eyes against the truth, harden his heart against the distress of his fellow man, and purchase heaven by money.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 28

Do these Presbyterians, or orthodox ... think we have forgotten what use they made of power, when they had it? Do they think we have forgotten how they drenched England in blood, created a civil war, (what they are in a fair way to do here) and, when they could no longer retain the power of killing there, came over to this country, and began it afresh -- dipping their hands in the blood of harmless, unresisting people? Do they think we have forgotten how they whipped, branded, banished, and imprisoned the innocent Quakers? Five of those who were banished, happening to return privately, to settle some private business, were taken and hung by those monsters, at one time. Do they think we have forgotten how they put innocent men, women, and children to death, in cool blood, under the pretence of witchcraft? "Even refused to bury the victims of their inhuman barbarity; but left them hanging on the gibbets, exposed to wild beasts, and birds of prey." The innocence of youth, the infirmities of old age, virgin modesty, fortune, honor, virtue, and the most dignified employments of the state, were no security; they hung a lawyer, because he refused to plead against those innocent sufferers; they hung seventeen in one day. Children of ten years of age were put to death; young girls were stripped naked, (by God's people, the ministers,) and the marks of witchcraft searched for, on their bodies, with the most indecent curiosity. Those spots of the scurvy, which age impresses upon the bodies of old men, were taken for evident signs of the infernal power. When witnesses failed, those blood-spilling monsters put the innocent creatures to tortures, to extort confessions dictated by their executioners, themselves; and they have the impudence to dictate to us now, to go to blood-spilling again; nothing else, under heaven. What else is it? They are in full possession of every liberty, but that of hanging heretics.... What did Calvin, their leader, do? Did he not burn an innocent man, by piece-meal -- kept him three days in torture, by the flames -- was this monster a Christian? True, all sects have been persecutors; but these persecutions were the acts of their tyrannical kings, pontiffs, and rulers. Not so those bloody Calvinists: they, when they have the power, devour their equals, their fellow men, with that wanton, savage ferocity, with which wild beasts destroy each other; and worse; for the wild beast only kills to satisfy his hunger; but those monsters of hypocrisy kill for the pure pleasure of seeing blood flow. It is bred in them; it is in their grain, and will never be extinguished; it is in the nature of their tenets, and a distinguishing trait of this sect.... Instead of inculcating those virtues which ennoble human nature, enlarge the powers of thinking, or advance their future happiness by a liberal course of improvement, they are taught that sordid avarice, and haughtiness, is religion; they tell the student that hating his neighbor, is religion; that all sects but his own are heretics, and must be exterminated to make way for God's people.
-- Anne Newport Royall, "Missionaries," Black Book, Volume III (1829), quoted from Annie Laurie Gaylor, ed, Women Without Superstition, p. 29-30

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